When you click Create new questionnaire the Improv3 questionnaire will be immediately available for you. It consists of:

  • dimensions

  • multiple-choice questions and

  • open-ended questions

Every part of the questionnaire, as a user, you can edit and adjust to the needs of your organization. From deleting the existing statements and questions, adding new ones, or creating a completely new adjusted questionnaire.

When it comes to dimensions, or better said closed-ended questions, you should pay attention while formulating statements. The statements are graded on a scale from 1 (I completely disagree) to 10 (I completely agree), or on a scale the users define, but the important thing is that the statements have positive connotation. I will explain why and how in the next examples.

Example:

I will start with a simple example

  • “I feel rested” - positive connotation where agreeing with the statement shows that the person feels rested

  • “I feel tired” - negative connotation where the 1-10 scale is inverted because 1 represents the positive, and agreeing with the statement shows that the person is tired

And now a more specific example

  • “I believe that the relationships among the employees are good” - positive connotation statement on a scale from 1 (I completely disagree) to 10 (I completely agree). In this case, agreeing with the statement indicates good relationships among employees.

  • “I believe that the relationships among the employees are not good” - negative connotation statement. In this case, the scale from 1-10 is inverted, because agreeing with the statement indicates bad relationships among employees. That consequently influences engagement results, especially if you are combining positive and negative connotation statements in the created questionnaire. Thereby the results you get with the measurement won’t showcase the real state because you won’t be able to tell what high/low results mean. Therefore it is important to pay attention to the connotation while creating new statements.

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